Krotos is based in Edinburgh, Scotland and creates unique audio software products for AAA game studios, film studios, and top-notch post-production companies worldwide. Their first product, Dehumaniser Pro, was launched November 2013 to rave reviews and since, the company has quickly grown in size whilst releasing numerous exciting products. As the brainchild of sound designer Orfeas Boteas, Krotos is always looking for ways to improve the post-production process while simultaneously making it fun for sound engineers.

        

12 Products by Krotos Audio :

Krotos Audio Concept 2

Concept 2

Concept 2 is a powerful, yet simple to use synth plug-in, aimed at those who want to make unique and incredible sounds fast. It takes the award-winning Concept synth...
Krotos Audio Dehumaniser 2

Dehumaniser 2

Dehumaniser 2 is the all-in-one solution that puts vital vocal sound design features at your fingertips, making it the ideal plugin for use in film, TV, video games,...
Krotos Audio Dehumaniser Simple Monsters

Dehumaniser Simple Monsters

Dehumaniser Simple Monsters is the fastest and easiest way to create extreme vocal effects for movies, music, games and animation. Perfect for audio professionals,...
Krotos Audio Igniter

Igniter

Igniter is the new industry standard for creating any real-world or sci-fi vehicle and engine sound effects with ease. Whether you work in audio post or game audio,...
Krotos Audio Igniter Full Tank

Igniter Full Tank

Igniter is a one-stop solution for designing, performing and automating vehicles directly in your DAW. From everyday vehicles, sports cars, motorbikes, planes,...
Krotos Audio Krotos Everything Bundle 2

Krotos Everything Bundle 2 Bundle

The Full Krotos Sound Design Software Package The Krotos Everything Bundle 2 combines the full plug-in catalog ( a total of 7) with the complete Krotos sound library...
Krotos Audio Reformer Pro

Reformer Pro

Design, automate, and perform sound effects in real-time. You do your best sound design work when you get the right sound from your head in sync with the scene....
Krotos Audio Simple Concept

Simple Concept

Simple Concept is an interactive and easy to use soft-synth powered by Krotos’ Concept synth engine, wrapped into a compact interface. With a simple workflow and a...
Krotos Audio Sound Design Bundle

Sound Design Bundle Bundle

The Sound Design Bundle is a unique offering from Krotos, and includes three of their flagship products : Dehumaniser 2, Reformer Pro (including the Krotos Bundle 1...
Krotos Audio Sound Design Bundle 2

Sound Design Bundle 2 Bundle

The Sound Design Bundle 2 is the complete Krotos package and includes four flagship products and a library: Dehumaniser 2, Reformer Pro, Weaponiser Fully Loaded,...
Krotos Audio Weaponiser Basic

Weaponiser Basic

Ideal for starter sound designers and tight budgets. It's a concise selection of weapons, whooshes, footsteps, magic, UI and Trailer assets. Weaponiser is a powerful...
Krotos Audio Weaponiser Fully Loaded

Weaponiser Fully Loaded

The Ultimate Sound Collection for Weaponiser, with these massive expansion libraries already included, in full: • Footsteps • User Interfaces • Whooshes •...

Latest News from Krotos Audio :

James David Redding III – Sound Designer & Sound Effects Editor Interview
Monday May 16, 2022
The Queen’s Gambit Sound Effects Editor James David Redding – Interview

In this interview, we interviewed James David Redding III, Prolific Sound Designer & Sound Effects Editor who has worked on The Queen’s Gambit, American Rust, The Americans, 30 Rock and The Matrix sound design, plus countless other projects.

James shares with us his beginnings in the industry, as well as what it was like working on the iconic sounds of The Matrix so early in his career, and how he approached the sound of The Queen’s Gambit, and much more.

James talks about how Reformer Pro and Weaponiser are always ready to go in his sound design template, and how much fun he has whilst saving time using Krotos software,

Watch The Full Interview With James: Prefer to Read the Interview? Read in full Below! Read the Full Transcript Alessandro

Hi all, this is Alessandro Mastroianni from Krotos. Today I have the great pleasure of having a fantastic guest with us. He is a sound designer and sound editor with a career spanning many years. In fact, an overall audio post-production wizard with many credits under his belt, including projects such as City on a Hill, The Americans and The Queen’s Gambit: James Redding. Hi, James. Thank you so much for being with us. I’m really excited about having this chat with you and thank you for taking the time from your, I’m sure, very busy schedule.

James Redding III

Thanks for having me. I’m excited to chat with you.

Alessandro

Right, so, as usual, we must start with the classic question on how you got started in the industry. I’m always fascinated to ask this because there is no such thing as a standard entry into this industry for us, so I’m excited to hear your story. Can you share a bit of that?

James Redding III

I mean, I’ve always been interested in sound. I was in a bunch of bands in high school. I started playing the guitar when I was in 6th grade, so about twelve years old. And I wanted to be the consummate rock star. Slash was one of my idols. And then I just wanted to be that person. Obviously, you can’t meet the Slash standard. But then I realised I wasn’t actually a very good musician. I was really good at making noise, but not musicality. I could tell when something was off, but I couldn’t get myself to produce what I wanted necessarily. So, I got into recording my friends and such. I went to Ithaca College in upstate New York. And then I started out as an English Major for one semester to appease my parents because my mother said I needed to have a real job. I shortly transitioned into their television and radio department and thought for a while that I wanted to get into radio and music production and so I got really heavily into audio production classes. And while I was at Ithaca, I had the opportunity to go to Los Angeles with their study abroad programme.

And I went out to LA and I was looking for audio internships in LA and I came across this studio called Dane Tracks and they sounded really cool. And I was like, all right, let me go check it out. And I went to their post-production studio and I got to meet Dane Davis and he was working on this film at the time called The Matrix. And I wasn’t allowed to tell anybody. It was really, really tough. But I just remember being like, “wow, this is fun”. And got to work with the Wachowskis and watch Dane as he created all these wonderful sounds. I mean, coming up with the idea of ‘bullet time’ and what the audio world would sound like when you’re travelling at the speed of a bullet and stuff like that. And I was like, wow, this is exciting. So, I went back to finish my degree and when I got back to Ithaca, I just buried my head in audio post-production. And I probably covered about 90% of the senior films that year for audio post, between mixing them and doing some sound design and stuff. And when I graduated that year, I used the alumni network of Ithaca and called up Ron Bokar of C Five and he gave me a quick opportunity at C Five.

But unfortunately, the project he was on was going on hiatus just as I started. But he connected me with another friend of his who went to Ithaca who worked at a company called Sync Sound and Sync Sound was looking for a night-time digital assistant. And I said, “Okay, sure”. So, I started off as a 6pm to 2am shift in the studio, cleaning up and reorganising systems. And at that time, Pro Tools was version five, I think, this was back in 2000, Pro Tools was version five. And not everybody was using it. There was another system called AMS Audio File. And so some of the editors used that. Some of them used Pro Tools and then they would switch rooms. There are about twelve different rooms at this facility. And so we’d have to move these carts that had basically a keyboard and monitor for the Pro Tools or would have the control head for the audio file. And every night I’d be switching rooms for the engineers. I did that for about six months or so. And then I got moved over to their big mixing stage, which was Digital Cinema, which was at the time the second-largest mix stage in New York.

And I started becoming a mix assistant in the afternoon. So, I got moved up to 2pm to 8pm which was much nicer on my sleep schedule. I worked with the great Ken Hahn and Grant Maxwell. And they taught me a lot about mixing. And then a lot of other mixers would come through, because again, being one of the larger stages in New York, Tom Fleischman came through. Lee Dicker came through. Leslie Schotz, Gary Rizzo, Ryan Kleise came through. Everybody who came to New York at one point or another sort of stopped in there. And it was great because I got to see so many different styles and learn so many different ways of people working. That was 2001 or whatever. And then I started just doing my own projects. And from there, I’ve gotten to work on dialogue editing, sound effects editing, Foley editing, Foley recording sound design, mixing. I’ve done everything from trailers and commercials and video games up to feature films, documentaries, and television series. And I’ve been sort of lucky that I don’t like to be pigeonholed and I like to be working.

Alessandro

That’s actually really cool. And I love the story about the very first small indie project that was Matrix. What a way to start a career. That must have been fun. And actually, sorry. Please go ahead.

James Redding III

It was great because Dane Davis is such a great master, and he’s so humble, and he was just so much fun to work with. And I keep in touch with Dan, and we text back and forth, and whenever I’m out in California, I stop in and say, “Hi”. And he’s a great guy. He taught me a lot of how to think about sound. It doesn’t necessarily matter what you’re using. It matters what it turns out to sound like, which was a lot of fun.

Alessandro

Yeah, I bet, that sounds really exciting. And I also love this idea that, I’m very much like you, like I like the fact that even if when you’re very young, you’re told that you need to heavily specialise on the field because you need to be the “go-to-guy” for doing a very specific thing. But I do see a lot of value in knowing a lot about many things. And it sounds like you’re doing exactly that. You have projects where you work as a sound editor, as a sound designer. I know you also have credits as a rerecording mixer, and you briefly mentioned dialogue editing and all that sort of stuff. So, would you say that mostly you do sound editor at the moment? Do you have, like, a speciality that you’re doing mostly at the moment?

James Redding III

Yeah, I mean, mostly people hire me for sound effects, but most of the time I’m either hired as a sound effects editor, sound designer, or a re-recording mixer for sound effects. I’ve done full projects where I’ve done everything, but recently, I’d say over the last couple of years, it’s mostly been heavily sound effects, which is fine for me because personally, that’s what I enjoy more. It goes back to my musicality and not being quite musical, I still like to make a lot of raucous noise, being able to stretch myself creatively with sound effects; as much as a creative challenge as dialogue editing can be, trying to clean up something or whatever, there’s something just more spiritually freeing for me with sound effects. I’m constantly listening for new sounds, I’m recording new sounds and that’s just where my head usually is.

Alessandro

Since I think that there is quite a lot of confusion in people that are not into the industry as to what exactly it is that the sound effects editor does nowadays (I think that many people have like some confusion with Foley arts and what a re-recording mixer does), would you like to explain a little bit what it means today? And I also know that it’s a bit dependent on projects and budgets, but can you give an overview of what it is that you do?

James Redding III

I could try. I’ve been doing it for 20 years, trying to explain it to people and I don’t think they always get it. But a sound effects editor, one thing people don’t realise while watching their programmes, television, movie, whatever, is that while they’re capturing the image, they’re trying not to capture more than just the voice. Part of that is just so that we can have control over things later and to keep the voice clear. So, when they capture just the voice, everything else is kind of gone and we have to create the world. So as a sound effects editor, most of the time we’re tasked with creating the sonic world that you’re watching. We’re cutting in backgrounds. I think people are always amazed whenever I give a studio tour and I show them that I have layers and layers of sounds that are background sounds, sounds that you take for advantage in the real-life, right? This idea of a sonic world around you; you don’t notice that there’s a vent going and a fan going and a bird chirping and a car passing by. As a sound effects editor, I noticed all that stuff and I’m putting that in to build this sonic world for what you’re watching because whether it’s reality or fiction that you’re watching, we’re still trying to just capture that voice and it would sound very weird without the rest of the world around it, but we have to control it.

So as a sound effects editor, we’re putting in these layers. In some ways, I’d like to say that we’re sort of adding ingredients for a cake, right? We’re putting in backgrounds, which are kind of like flour, and then we’re putting in birds and cars, which are kind of like sugar and eggs, to sort of blend it together and give it a little flavour. And then we’re adding some vanilla, which is like the sound design, right? The vanilla flavour and the cinnamon on top to give it that extra spice, extra kick. That’s the sound design sort of part of it. And it’s all coming together. And then that’s where the re-recording mixer comes in, more like the baker, right? The sound effects editor is kind of like the sous chef. And then the re-recording mixer is a baker, where they take it and they blend it all together and they masterfully craft it and bake it to just that right consistency for your ears, where you sit there and go, “This tastes good going into my head. Oh, yeah!” So that’s sort of how I like to describe the two different disciplines, as far as editing and rerecording, mixing and Foley sort of gets in there and people do get confused.

I always think of Foley, as I tell my students, I actually just taught this last week. Foley is like the ADR for sound effects. We’re performing a sound effect in sync with the picture and it’s a very specialised sound. Most of the time it’s covering footsteps and Foley is just another ingredient to put in that cake. It’s what makes it either vanilla or chocolate cake. Right. You’re putting in that extra ingredient that’s giving it that flavour. So that’s where Foley is its own little speciality. But we’re all part of the same thing. We’re all part of the same team and we’re all trying to make something delicious. It’s just instead of tasting it with your mouth, you’re tasting it with your ears.

Alessandro

Wow. This is one of the best explanations that I’ve ever heard about the various disciplines of audio post-production. Really cool. And while you were telling this, I was thinking that Matrix must have been a fantastic project to learn on, also, because there were so many things that we now take for granted that that film completely revolutionised. As you briefly mentioned ‘bullet time’, which has been now exploited to death, but that was the very first thing. And what is the sound of slow-motion? How do you create a sound that doesn’t exist? It must have been like a very cool project to start your career on.

James Redding III

It was great. And the best part about it working at Dane Tracks was it was a very small audio post crew. Dane Davis, Julia Evershade, Eric was on it. We had a handful of people on it and I got to see everybody doing their job. I got to see the dialogue edit, I got to see the sound effects edit. We went and recorded stuff with John Fasal. We went and destroyed Julia’s bathroom because she was having it renovated anyway, and it was marble. So, we went in and we bashed the daylights out of this marble bathroom and collected these great sounds. And there’s the lobby, right. The lobby shoot up scene is Julia’s bathroom being destroyed.

And then I got to work with John Rosha at Warner Brothers. At the time, he was a Warner Bros Foley artist and we took televisions, we took 27-inch television, tube TVs because you got to remember this was the 90s so we had tube TVs, we didn’t have the flat screens yet and those vacuum tubes: John Rush figured out that if you took the plastic casing off the TV and just exposed the tube and then threw a brick at it, once you broke that seal, it imploded and came out with this great boom! We blew upI think we imploded like at least 20 televisions in the Warner Brothers stage. But again, I got to see this.

I never thought of the Foley artists doing explosions and John taught me that and I never thought of these little glass movements for the bomb in the elevator, John was showing me. “Oh yeah, if you take these test tubes and you slide them against each other”. So, I got to see all these great, different parts of it and it was such a learning experience, an eye-opening experience for me so early in my career, that I was very spoiled.

Alessandro

Yeah, it sounds very interesting. So, moving on, at Krotos we are very much into workflow. We are trying to revolutionise the way that the sound designer approaches the job. So, it’d be quite interested in learning how you start a project, how do you approach it and what are the differences between the projects that you do? For example, what is the difference between feature film, not just in terms of budgets and requirements, but also the scheduling of a feature film versus a TV series, things like that. And also if you could tell us a little bit how Krotos products fit into this workflow, I’d be really interested.

James Redding III

So, I kind of approach every project the same, whatever their budget is, whatever their schedule is. After having a discussion with the creatives on it, whether it’s the showrunner or director, I dive in and for me usually, it’s sound effects so I start with the background so I can get through the whole project once just setting up how the scenes are flowing and really what I’m trying to do is establish what the flow is because as a sound artist myself, I like to have a flow. I like to feel how it’s going to move and so I start with the backgrounds and I get a nice big broad stroke across the whole thing of backgrounds and then I start going in with details and details and details and details and again it’s a flow thing though.

I don’t like spending a lot of time looking for things. I have about four and a half terabytes worth of sound effects at this moment, 400,000 something files and luckily, I have a great database program to search through them. It’s all about trying to find that sound that I want to fit in quickly and that’s sort of actually where Krotos has helped me a lot with a lot of different parts of it.

So, where Krotos fits in for me with that is, I actually now have a couple of Krotos plugins just in my sound design template for when I’m editing. I have a Weaponiser in there, I have Igniter in there, and I have Reformer Pro. And what’s great about them is that I can quickly sketch out an idea, if not fully flesh out an idea, while working in such a flow. I’ve talked about Reformer Pro before on YouTube, where I used it for this water scene in American Rust, which was a Showtime series.

It was so freaking cool, I had it already in my template, so I just activated it. I put up my microphone, I loaded in some water sounds, and then as I’m watching this person swimming underwater, I’m like, “it’s triggering all these water sounds!”. The water scene went like that. Whereas if I was to do it the traditional way, it would have taken me a long time to get the right water sounds. And then you have to cut them in, right?

And then you have to sit there and you kind of lose that flow. There is a momentum to it, but you kind of lose the flow. It’s nice to be able to quickly get things done. Same with Weaponiser. I’ve used Weaponiser in a number of different ways for not only gunshots.

In City on a Hill, every gunshot since Season 2 has been performed with Weaponiser because it’s great because I can a) quickly pull up a couple of guns that I’ve already designed in there because these are all supposed to be real world guns. So, I’ve designed a couple of specific ones in there that I can sit there and I have my keyboard next to me and I just trigger them as I see them go by with the module flashes on screen. And I can go in and readjust them if I want to.

Sometimes what’s great is that I can take what the picture editor has already put in, because if they haven’t put in the muzzle flashes, they usually put in a temp sound effect, and I can usually take their temp sound effect and since Weaponiser is an instrument in Pro tools, I put it up on the MIDI track.

And it recognises the MIDI, and I can match what the picture editor has put in as their timing. Whether or not I like their timing, that’s a different story, but it speeds up the process that much faster for me getting where I need to faster, because again, it comes down to flow, especially with a TV series, a show like City on a Hill, it’s a one-hour programme that we have seven days to edit.

So, it’s a very tight turnaround and they’re expecting cinematic. And then when we go to films, usually it’s a two-hour film that I get something like six weeks to edit on. So, the turnaround comes out differently. The flow ends up being different, but I still approach it the same way.

I start with broad strokes, and then I go in in more and more detail, which it depends on how much time and how quickly I can do it and how much detail we can get done. So that’s why a quick way of working comes in really handy. Having my tools easily, readily available to me is very important.

Alessandro

Yeah, I think that’s a great point. I also like, other than the actual, obviously saving of time, I really like this idea of performing your own sound effects. I like the fact that you can really remove a barrier between the final project and you as a sound designer. It’s less editing, it’s less mouse and keyboard, and is more sort of a fluid experience while working on it, which I personally enjoy a lot.

James Redding III

Yeah. Especially with Igniter, since I’ve gotten that again starting about Season 2 of City on a Hill, I think is when I got a lot of these tools, I have Igniter so that I have it on my tablet that I can control the rev with my tablet, so I can just sit there with just a glide on my finger, riding that rev, and you can follow the flow of the car that you’re working on.

Weaponiser. Just the other day I was doing a gunfight that had shots, and then we need to hear impacts, and it was great because you can separate those different parts of Weaponiser. You can do the main shot, the body and the tail and everything. And so I made the tail, the impacts, and then since you can control it with different keyboard notes, I could do the shot, and then I could do the tail with my other finger, and it was great because then you get the rhythm, right.

Everything in life has a rhythm, and you can get the rhythm of the edit of what’s happening. And even though it might not necessarily be represented on picture, that rhythm sort of is almost more important.

And so you can sort of play that gunshot. It’s ridiculous. You’re playing gunshots, but it helps the emotion of a story in ways that people aren’t even conscious of. Most of the audience isn’t conscious of what I’m doing, and I don’t ever want them to be conscious of what I’m doing.

But being able to perform it, I can insert myself as an artist onto something. right? In just little ways. I tell the folks from Krotos constantly, I’m like, It’s just fun. And if there’s anything that you want when you’re working, I didn’t become an accountant for a reason. And I’m not saying that accountants don’t have their own fun, but in my job, I want to have some fun. If I’m doing this with some of these gruelling schedules and not having fun, then there’s something wrong. I got to be doing something different.

Alessandro

Absolutely. Yeah. If you don’t mind me asking, is that your home studio? Do you do a lot of this editorial part of the job in your own house?

James Redding III

I do. This is my home studio. I set this up about seven or eight years ago. I mean, I’ve had a home studio since I graduated. I’ve gotten it more powerful, I should say, in the last seven years. I’m now set up for 7.1 in my studio. And I’m in the process of figuring out how to get ceiling speakers in my space for ATMOS. But, yeah, I do pretty much, for the last seven or eight years, I’ve pretty much done everything out of my house.

The Americans, I mixed in person in New York, but the Queen’s Gambit crew, I did all my editorial stuff out of my house. I’ve mixed features here and then gone to studios in New York, California. I did a feature one time, it was so much fun where I did most of the temp stuff all at home. And then I went into a gigantic studio in New York and mixed some of it there and then got to go out to Skywalker for a couple of days and mix out there. So, it was sort of fun to see the translation and know that as long as you set things up properly to the standard and you sort of calibrate your room,

I was able to translate from my home studio all the way to Skywalker, which was just a fascinating experience and just such a fun campus to be on. But as far as being home, I love being in my home studio. I have my settings, my plugins, my keyboard. I have two different tablets that I use for different triggering purposes. I have one that’s an XY pad set-up. I have another one that I switch between using Avid Control on and using TouchDAW on as another keyboard so that I can get different octaves at the same time. My little S1, you can’t see it because it’s in front of me. The camera is actually sitting sort of on top of it at the moment. I have my comfortable little spot. I know what it sounds like, and I can drink my own coffee and I can see my daughter. And those sort of things are important.

Alessandro

Yeah. I think it’s amazing the way technology has evolved to allow us to do a lot of this stuff from home. I’m seeing it more and more, and obviously the pandemic. Well, I was about to say didn’t help, but actually did help into making this profession, this idea of working from home more acceptable at many levels. And I was actually just talking with another post-production mixer, we were talking about headphones, and we were talking about a specific model of headphones, and he was like a rerecording mixer in a massive studio in London, and he said, “I did all the temp stuff at home on these headphones, and it actually translated okay,” like he made a few adjustments on the reverb here and there, so the technology is definitely there and I absolutely agree with you there, those things are important.

James Redding III

It’s great to have the flexibility of it. Like I said, I’ve had this studio for a long time. I started off with a stereo set-up. When I first started at Sync Sound, I had, what was it, the Digi 001, I think running Pro Tools 5. At the time, I could only do stereo. I figured out a way how to trick it. It was Pro Tools LE, actually, and I figured out a way how to trick it to have time code before it was allowed to have time code.

Like there was no DV toolkit or anything like that. So, I learned how to trick it to have time code. And it was great to have that flexibility that instead of having to spend all night in a studio, I could bring stuff home on a hard drive and work on it a little bit. And then nowadays, unless I have a client that I need to meet with, I do like the comforts of my house, but I will go into the city. I have great relationships with Postworks and Soundtracks and Harbor and Sound Lounge and all these great studios in the city that have great mixers on staff too.

But I have the ability to go in and work with them also, and not have to tie up resources all the time. And sometimes I’m working on a small indie that can’t afford something that big, so I can mix it here and then go there and finish it up. But the other thing that I really like is I have my settings the way I like it. I have a comfort level of certain things that, I did find while I was at Sync Sound, I was constantly switching rooms and I would always have to bring my settings with me or reset them up.

And now it’s like, okay, it’s only every once in a while that I have the inconvenience of having to do that somewhere else. And it’s great because I always say to my clients, including the studios that hire me from New York, I always say, like, if I work here, I can be more creative faster. I have my sound effects, I have my database. And not that they don’t have the same sound effects. We all have sort of the same libraries, we all have the sound ideas libraries from like, the late nineties and stuff like that.

But it’s just that comfort factor where you’re like, again finding that flow. And it’s easy for me having the Krotos Sound Design Bundle 2, it’s like, okay, it’s set up: I have my microphone right here and, okay, I need to Reformer Pro something, pull it over, turn on my phantom power and go. Whereas if I try to explain that to another studio, that like, “hey, so I’m going to need a mic, and I’m going to need this, and that,”, there’s certain things about it that just make it so much nicer.

Alessandro

Absolutely. Let’s talk specific projects a little bit, if you don’t mind. So, you mentioned things like designing gunshots for a City on a Hill, and you worked on The Americans, which was a period drama, so obviously its own specificity. And I’ve actually watched very recently The Queen’s Gambit and absolutely loved it, it was obviously massively successful. And I’d be quite interested in knowing, I think it’s a project that is very interesting to do sound for, even if it doesn’t have, like, gunshots and other things that we typically associate with cinematic sound design, what it was like to create a sound world for a project that is more psychological, if you want to call it that, or a real dramatic story that was so fun and intense and emotional, but not only, if you know what I mean.

James Redding III

Yeah, it was one of those projects, I got to work with such a great crew of people with The Queen’s Gambit. And the way it came about was I actually happened to be at a holiday party at Gold Crust in New York, and I was talking with Eric Hirsch, and we’d never worked together before, but we were talking and he was like, “Oh, man, I got this great project coming up. I’d love to have you do sound effects on it,”. And Gregg Swiatlowski was going to be on it doing dialogue.

And I was like, “Okay, cool,”. I’ve worked with Gregg before on other projects, and I was like, “Okay, cool,”. And he’s like, “Yeah, it’s about chess,”. And I was like, “Okay, cool, try to still sound excited about it…!”, not knowing anything about it, really. But they were coming up with a workflow of which we were going to be doing sort of temp dubs while we’re editing and handing them back over to the picture department and then getting them back. There’s a lot of back and forth. And Eric was like, “Look, I really want you on this because you’re a mixer also, so you can sort of pre dub it and hand it off,

And I don’t have to worry too much about it and everything,”. I was like, “Yeah, okay, cool,”. And then I got the first reel or the first episode. Actually, the first episode I got was the second one. So, I was very confused in the beginning. I was like, “I don’t know what’s happening!”. But I got the first one, and it was just shot so well, and it was acted so well, and it was edited so well. And when I started watching, I was like, “Okay, this isn’t just chess, right?”. This is something more. This is something that is a beautiful piece of craftsmanship across the board. And it was only fitting to try to match that with audio

. And so, my first task and actually what ended up being my biggest task for the whole thing was doing the background and coming up with what the world was going to sound like. It is a period piece. So, it’s trying to figure that out, right. Trying to make sure that you’re staying within that realm. But it’s also psychological. And how do you make the basement sound like a basement, but not be a basement, but be something else.

Right. It’s part of Beth’s sort of upbringing to some extent. It’s a scary thing that she sort of goes through and opens up a world to her that she didn’t have before. So, it was one of those things where you just sit there and you’re like, “Wow, okay, I gotta meet this,”. And those are my favourite projects. When you have a project that you can see all the layers that have gone into it so far and how good it’s going to be, you’re like, “Okay, I got to raise my game up,”. And those are great because they push you and they challenge you. And again, working with such a great team, Pat Cicero. I mean, it ended up being weird because while we were working on it is when the pandemic hit of Covid 19. And so everybody just sort of did this weird 180. I was already working from home, right? I was already here, but everybody else was scrambling and trying to figure out how to make that work. And so a lot of communication was lost during part of that, but it pulled through wonderfully. I was not able to be at the final mixes, unfortunately.

But man was super happy when I saw them, though, because I watched it with the rest of the world on Netflix when it was first released. And I just remember writing to Eric and being like, “Wow, this sounds amazing!” So, it was a pleasure to be part of that.

Alessandro

Yeah, it really was a fantastic production. Let’s finish off with talking a little bit about the future. You’re also involved in education. You teach at NYU, right? “Yes, I do,”. So, you have an overview into what the young generation of inspiring sound designers looks like. And how do you see the role of the sound designer evolving? It’s changed a lot over the years and where do you see the profession going? And maybe if you want also to give some advice to aspiring sound designers and in general, audio post-production people interested in audio bus production.

James Redding III

Sure. I’m very optimistic about the future of sound. I’ve seen it grow from what it was, some of the great classics of what sound design was and how we’ve advanced so far. There are some setbacks every once in a while, because audio is one of those things that people don’t understand quite yet. They like to say they understand it, right? Everybody’s heard the quote, “Sound is 50% of the film”, but a lot of young filmmakers don’t really understand how we expand the screen because it’s hard for them to touch it. It’s not tangible to them. When they see a picture edit, they understand the picture edit.

But when we change a frequency, depending on their hearing, right? Whether or not it works for them, right? But the young sound designers, the young students that I have coming through my class, I teach a sound mix workshop at NYU every semester. It’s 14 classes. And so I’m with these kids for a semester, and I’m seeing some great promise of kids who are getting it. They understand what their role is and how important it is and how to do it. Because of the fact that all these advancements have been made in the tools, they are able to get to places where before when I was first starting out, it was like, “Oh, hold on, I have to cut this Mag reel right now,”

They’re just like, “Oh, give me 2 seconds and I’ll tap it out on my keyboard,” and it’s done. They’re able to push it that much further. And I think they’re understanding the importance, and they’re trying to tell their friends who are filmmakers, who are directors at NYU, “Hey, let’s capture the audio correctly in the beginning,”. “Hey, this is what I can do for you in the end,”.

And that communication is starting a lot more, which is very promising because that’s I think the one thing that holds production back is not understanding that you need to capture it correctly the first time audio wise, it’s always going to be better. You know, as far as advice that I always give people is, don’t ever turn something off. Don’t ever shun away a job. My first job was at night-time studio assistant. It was that 6pm to 2am and I was lifeguarding during the day.

And then would go to the studio at night because I wasn’t making enough money at night. Was it gruelling? Yeah. But I also learned a lot because one of the great things about working at night is that there are a few editors, so I got to sit in with the editors. Always ask questions, always try to learn something new, even constantly.

Now myself, I’m always trying to push myself into learning new techniques, learning new ways of doing something. I’ve been reteaching myself things about MIDI that I had forgotten that I learned in school. Always learn from other people, right? I learn from my students. I always tell them, “I’ll teach you quick keys that you don’t know, but I expect to get something back from you,”. And what I get back from them is their thought process, right? Everybody has a different way of hearing. Always learn from what other people are doing.

We sit there and do critical listening classes where we sit there and listen to other people’s mixes. And, yeah, we pick them apart a little bit, but we pick them apart so that we can make things better, right? We’re not knocking the mixes. We’re knocking like, “Oh, what could have been happening here that caused that to happen,” right? It could have been a bad day. It could have been a rough schedule. It could have been X, Y and Z. How can we try to mitigate that in our future projects? So always learn, always ask and don’t be afraid to sort of step out a little bit. Don’t be obnoxious about it, obviously,

But don’t be afraid to step out and try to show off a little bit. You’re going to fail and that’s part of the learning process. There are times where I make sounds and I’m like, “This is the coolest sound ever!” and then I play it for the director or the editor and they’re like, “What is that? Turn that off! I don’t like that,” “But that was like an hour of my time!” But if I didn’t do that, I wouldn’t have learned the technique that I used to do that. I wouldn’t have pushed myself that much further and I want to say, like I always say, push and learn and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Nobody expects you to know everything. Even nowadays I don’t expect myself to know everything. I think that’s it!

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Check out these tutorials from James David Redding III

For more on the sound of The Queen’s Gambit, check out this awesome article from asoundeffect

You Might Also Be Interested In… How Nicolas Titeux Improved his Video Game Sound Design Workflow Using Weaponiser Quickly Sound Design an Intense Police Car Chase, with Igniter 5 Things You Never Knew Reformer Pro Could Do For You Products Mentioned

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The post James David Redding III – Sound Designer & Sound Effects Editor Interview appeared first on Krotos.

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Product Update: Reformer Pro V1.1.5
Friday May 13, 2022
The Newly Improved Reformer Pro is Here!

You asked, we listened! Many of you have requested that we expand the content that ships with Reformer Pro. From today, Reformer Pro ships with a total of 29 new libraries covering a huge range of use cases straight out of the box; cloth Foley, debris, air, fire, surfaces, animals, and electrical effects are all at your fingertips.

This makes Reformer Pro an even more powerful addition to your everyday Foley arsenal for post production and game audio workflows.

This new Factory Library is available to EXISTING and NEW users from today. If you are an existing Reformer Pro (or Krotos Bundle) user, simply log into your account and look for the new Reformer Pro Factory Content Installer. This replaces the older ‘Krotos bundle 1’ installer which previously shipped with the plugin.

For more information on the new Factory Library and how it can help your workflow, check out our new product page www.krotosaudio.com/reformer-pro/.

Version 1.1.5 of the plugin is also now available. This contains a collection of fixes, particularly a range of crash fixes for Pro Tools and more efficiency gains.

Happy Reforming!

I already own Reformer Pro. How do I get the update?

We strongly recommend all users of the plugin upgrade to take advantage of this greater stability and efficiency.

To get the latest version of Reformer Pro, log into your Krotos account, and head to the ‘My Downloads’ section. Or you can simply hit the ‘Update’ option in the Menu bar in the plugin itself.

Take me there

The post Product Update: Reformer Pro v1.1.5 appeared first on Krotos.

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How To Sound Design Footstep Sound Effects
Thursday May 5, 2022
Footsteps Sound Effects – Without a Foley Stage Weaponiser. Footstep-iser? Traileriser? Whooshifier! OK, i’ll stop.

It had to be named something, but behind the name is a powerful multi-layered one-shot sampler with awesome variation and timing offset capabilities, suitable for countless use cases.

Of course, it is perfect for weapons, but it is actively used for lots of use cases, by freelancers & game audio designers, and even in Hollywood post-production studios by sound designers who want to work smarter, not harder. Take footsteps for example…

Fast track your footsteps editing, and make it fun to do so!

Using the Footsteps SFX collection for Weaponiser, Now you can fast track your editing routine tasks. In the video below, we show you how we used the Footsteps bundle in Weaponiser in conjunction with Reformer Pro to create the sound effects for our promotional video.

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Try a free 10-day demo

Weaponiser is available for a free 10 day trial period so you can take your time to evaluate the software.

Weaponiser Footsteps bundle Buy Now

Footsteps Sound Effects Library

Provided by Krotos. The Footsteps Bundle is a comprehensive collection of 1885 dynamic shoe, step and surface assets... €97.17 Buy Now

Weaponiser Fully Loaded

Your Secret Sound Design Weapon Weaponiser is an inspiring audio layering solution that allows you to design,... €638.37 Buy Now

Reformer Pro

Reformer Pro is a unique ‘sound design instrument’, that transforms pre-recorded audio files into performable sound... €404.67 Buy Now

Clothes & Materials Foley Sound Effects Library Vol. 1

Provided by Krotos. The Clothes & Materials Foley Bundle by Krotos is an extensive collection of... €183.27

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Trailer Sound Design: Tips & Tricks (2022 Update)
Thursday May 5, 2022
Advice for Designing Movie Trailer Sound Effects Contents:
  • Important trailer sound design advice
  • Interview with a trailer composer
  • Sound design tips and tricks
  • An awesome Weaponiser case study using Krotos Trailers Sound Library

The movie trailer audio business is as booming as ever, and with every film release brings new trailer hit sound effects; be that a new take on the movie trailer boom sound effect known as The Booj, or a crunchy reiteration of Hans Zimmer’s Inception Braam Sound Effects to psych us up for the next Marvel Cinematic Universe Addition or the latest genre-breaking thrill ride by Christopher Nolan.

Combining these staple sound effects with a dramatic cover of a heavily abstract pop song, and you have yourself a recipe for contemporary trailer greatness!

Trailers have always been a dynamic and exciting way to sell a film, and as the booming voice over narrators of the 1990s fade further and further away, new composers & film studios are looking for new and exciting stylistic tropes to push the trailer sound effects envelope even further.

We have included some fantastic content below for you to explore, and brush up on your pre-existing trailer design chops, including an interview with Joshua Fielstra, who is one of the busiest trailer composers of the moment, plus some excellent tips and tricks we have learned since this blog was first published in 2020 on how you can start to create your own movie trailer sound effects, or improve your existing sound design skills.

Working with Movie Trailer Sounds – Joshua Fielstra Interview

We talked recently in the interview above with Joshua Fielstra about all things trailers; the technology, the current trends and tropes and the logistics of trailer composition and more. The interview de-mystified many areas of the trailer business, highlighting the important things to remember when working in this field.

Read the best bits here!

Joshua has composed and sound design the trailers for films including Deadpool, Suicide Squad, Interstellar, Game of Thrones and many more. check out his work at his website.

5 Tips for Designing Trailer Sound Effects

Designing movie trailer sounds is a challenging task. The goal is to grab the attention of the viewer so that they cannot wait to see the full release. At the same time, you need to be careful not to fall into various trailer sound cliches and make the trailer fade away into the sea of sameness. Did I also mention that it’s all probably on a very limited time scale? Did it suddenly get hot in here?

Fear not, as this blog post is here to help you on your trailer-making journey (especially if you are just starting out and feel a bit overwhelmed), and – hopefully – alleviate some of the stress and maybe even inspire you to consider some approaches.

Over the course of this post, I’ll be looking at general best practices, ideas and we’ll also take a look at how software and libraries from Krotos can help you get your creative gears going and let you work faster and more efficient, leaving more time for the fun parts of the job. More specifically, I’ll show some workflow capabilities of Weaponiser and focus on content of the Trailers Library.

Note: I have also created some cinematic hits and whooshes for the purpose of this demonstration. You can download the original assets for free and use them for whatever you fancy!

Tip 1: Dynamics and Suspense in Trailer Sound Effects

One of the common pitfalls that sound designers need to watch out for is the ‘louder means better’ design approach. I love a powerful sound just like any other person but I’d like to propose that the power comes from INCREASING the dynamic range of your content, not decreasing it through overcompression. To show this, we’ll take a look at the first scene accompanying our blog post: the server room shutdown.

Creating Anticipation

All the machinery in the room gradually shuts down before the red light comes on. I’ll use some content from our User Interface Library to create sounds of the machines and then I’ll pitch it down as the lights go out. I have rendered some instances of the UI Glitched Machine preset in Weaponiser. I have spammed the Fire button and now we have loads of glitchy computer beeps that will serve as the main chunk of our sounds. We will keep this in a relatively soft/medium intensity and fade the volume as the lights gradually go down. This will create space for the blast. It is the big jump in amplitude that will help us sell the change of light. If everything was on a similar level, we just wouldn’t hear that much of a difference.

Adding Blast SFX

The lights go down completely and then… BOOM. I wanted to create an association of the red light representing something ominous and therefore created some shrieking synth blasts. I have remixed the preset Cinematic Transition 1 from the Trailers Library by adding the new impacts.

Image 1: Cinematic Transition 1 preset with added content.

Now I have the main component of the hit sound done with one click of the button in Weaponiser. I have also rendered all the other tabs of Weaponiser as separate outputs so that I can still control the mix of the individual pieces.

Image 2: Separate renders of two Weaponiser remixed presets.

The Aftershock

Right after the initial blast, I lowered the volume significantly, leaving only some ominous drone tones and corrupted UI bleeps. This part is meant to keep us on the edge and sell the idea that something evil has settled in this room.

And just like that, we’re done with the first part! We have created an impactful transition by letting the main sound breathe.


P.s. I’m getting some serious Control vibes from the red light.

Tip 2: Layers are absolutely vital

Layering sound effects is a fantastic way of creating unique sounds, especially if time constraints are not allowing for full fledged design. In this part, we’ll be combining three different presets from the Cinematic Trailers library to create the soundscape of a pirate ship scene.

As the camera pans, we start off close to the first ship, slowly moving away from it and focusing more and more on the second one. I wanted to create a sense of peril and adventure and give some character to both ships to distinguish them. Thus, I have chosen three sounds to represent what I have identified as 3 protagonists of the scene: the first ship, the sea and the second ship.

The first ship introduces the feeling of danger by using the dark horn blast of the Thriller Transition 1 preset, which fits really well with the design of the ship (that’s a lot of skeletons). Next, we’ll use the rattly textures of the Adventure Drone preset to symbolise the sea as the play-field for our dangerous adventure. This part adds to the mystery and suspense of the scene. The second ship represents power as we now see that this is an organised group (or maybe they will fight each other? Who knows!). A string theme taken from the String Stinger 1 preset will help us convey the sense of pirate might. Layered and crossfaded together, they give us a unique sound scene:

Insert some sea ambiences (why yes, by layering!) to ground the listening experience and our second scene is ready!

Tip 3: Contrast your sounds with Silence

Lack of sound can be as gripping as an explosion. Sometimes even more! If you’ve watched it, THAT hyperspace jump from The Last Jedi comes to mind. It is most likely an evolutionary trait that makes us as attentive to the quick snappy sounds (as we needed to watch out from snapping twigs, or something that is snapping the twig, more precisely) as to the sudden lack of sound (something suddenly stopped moving). This has been used in cinema for quite some time, i.e. in the outdoor dinner preparation scene in Once Upon The Time In The West. We’re going to take the rapid planet close-up clip and play around with our listening expectations.

Use Risers and Swells

First, we’re going to saturate our ears with a very rich riser that will follow the planetary approach. This will create a certain expectation for the follow-up sound that we will break (a bit). To create the sound of the swell, I’ve used two instances of the String Swell Short preset from the Cinematic Trailer library, along with some original content. The final riser sounds like this:

Cut Impact

Now we’re going to abruptly cut almost all of the sounds used in the swell and leave only a transient of the hit and a low-end drop. This will create a feeling of void which fits perfectly with the space theme of the clip and grabs our attention as we feel the sudden lack of sound.

Tip 4: Shaping your SFX through automation

Parameter automation is essential when dealing with repetitive content and the boxer scene is the perfect example of that. In this scene, we will be creating variation using some handy Weaponiser features and then we will shape our scene through various levels of automation.

Asset creation

There’s a lot of punching in this clip and we need to make it varied. Tracklaying would take quite some time so we will use some of the features of Weaponiser to get a wide range of non-repetitive assets by making a fresh preset. I have taken various assets of boxing pad work and added them to separate banks in Weaponiser. Then I have set those banks to randomise so that the plugin does not play them back in the same order. As we have four different banks, five assets each, we now have 5 x 5 x 5 x 5 = 625 possible asset combinations! To make it even better, we’ll slightly randomise the playback speed of the sample to get pitch variation. I think we are covered for this scene!

Image 3: new padwork patch

Now we need to sync the impacts. To make our life easier, we’ll setup a MIDI item that will send information to the padwork patch we have just created to cue the sound on the timeline, giving us perfect sync and loads of variation.

Image 4: MIDI item triggering Weaponiser playback

Afterwards, I used some designed impacts to make a second pass and various natural and abstract whooshes to make the core sounds of the scene.

P.s. I used the content of our Battle Bundle library for the natural hits and whooshes

Asset Automation

Now we will take a look at the micro-level of the automation in this scene. As we used Weaponiser to quickly sync our assets, now we should have time to fine tune the automation of whooshes and hits. I’m changing the pan and volume parameters of the whooshes and I’m setting the punches in the proper locations corresponding to the position on the screen. This gives us a sense of movement and breathes life into the scene.

Image 5: snippet of the automation curves in the scene

Shaping the Scene

With individual hits automated, we can now look at the bigger picture. The video speeds up, starting with slow motion and going to normal speed at the end. I have created two sets of assets – abstract hits and natural sounding boxing. Natural does not necessarily mean ‘realistic’; we can hear punches, even though the person is air boxing. The impacts did, however, fit the scene style more and I do feel that the task of a sound designer is to enhance the reality and not represent it (Sarah Connor’s footsteps in Terminator 2, anyone?). We’re using automation to crossfade between the abstract and natural soundscapes, shaping our scenes with volume parameters.

Tip 5: Your Choice of Sounds Sets Tone of the Trailer

In my opinion, the last clip is a great example of the enormous capabilities of sound for setting the tone. The video itself is quite neutral. If you watch it without any sound, your emotional associations can be quite varied. Therefore, it is up to the sonic layer to determine the emotional impact of this clip.

For the purposes of this blog post, I’ve chosen to focus on the feelings of danger, distance and isolation. Therefore, I used the Horror Transition 3 and 4 presets, combined with a distant Horror Hit 2 (this feels very Alien, doesn’t it?). This is also a great example of the fact that you sometimes do not need many sounds to wrap up a scene. Those three instances do the job really well and the sounds are only 3 clicks away!

To demonstrate how different our perception of the scene can be, compare how the scene would feel like with the soundscape of the pirate ship clip:

For me, the second clip is something much more akin to action/superhero trailer. All thanks to the sound!

Now its time to create your own movie trailer audio

Throughout this blog, we’ve looked at different ways in which we can bring the trailer to another level through audio and how to work effectively by using various ready-made presets in Weaponiser and by designing our own patches. We have also looked at some general approaches as well. Presented scenes cover a wide range of environments and content genres and therefore we can safely assume that the ideas presented here will be of use regardless of the type of content you are working on.

If you’d like to see for yourself how Weaponiser can speed up your workflow, head to the link below to grab a free demo.

And don’t forget your free sounds!

DOWNLOAD SOUNDS Weaponiser Buy Now

Weaponiser Basic

Your Secret Sound Design Weapon Weaponiser is an inspiring audio layering solution that allows you to design,... €220.17 Buy Now

Weaponiser Fully Loaded

Your Secret Sound Design Weapon Weaponiser is an inspiring audio layering solution that allows you to design,... €638.37

The post Trailer Sound Design: Tips & Tricks (2022 Update) appeared first on Krotos.

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How To Create Robot Movement Sound Effects With Ben Jacquier
Friday April 29, 2022



Robotic Mech Sound Design Using Reformer Pro & Weaponiser

How to Make Robot Movement Sound Effects

Ben Jacquier recently shared this video with us, where he re-designs a mech walking sound effect from Gears of War using Reformer Pro, Weaponiser and some awesome libraries from the Krotos Ultimate Bundle which contains an insane amount of Libraries for you to use in your re-designs from foley, FX, Whooshes, Mech, Explosions, Destruction and More. Let’s get into it!

Hello, my name is Ben. I’m a French music composer and sound designer and today I’m going to use Krotos plugins to do some sound re-designs for Gears of War. I use Presonus Studio One as a DAW for my work, but you an achieve the same results in your own preferred DAW. let’s get into it!

The first thing we will design is the mech walking sound effects.

Robot Walking Sound Effects with Reformer Pro

It is really time-consuming to put a footstep sound on every step that he takes manually, so I’m going to use Krotos Reformer Pro to make things much faster. I’m going to mimic his movements and steps with my mouth, and my recording will be the trigger for Reformer Pro’s sound libraries. It’s a really simple and efficient way to spot to picture and you can hear a scene begin to take shape immediately instead of using markers.

I loaded Reformer Pro into a track and explored the library. I can find awesome robotic sound effects using Reformer Pro’s search tool. I am using it the Krotos Ultimate Bundle, which comes with thousands of sounds to choose from for all kinds of purposes. I want the robot sound effects to sound it’s older and not too techy, so I have combined the Soundmorph Robotic Lifeforms libraries with Soundbits Drags and Scrapes, using the bucket drag preset to add a clunkiness to the scene, which suits my design much better.

Creating Robot Movement Sound Effects Vocally

Performing the sounds with your voice is very fun to do. Reformer Pro will be triggered by any Audio Input, whether you hitting the microphone, running a guitar through it or choosing to use a contact microphone if you don’t want to use your voice, or even using MIDI.

We’re lacking some low frequencies to make it more powerful and impactful as it is a big robot, so let’s find another library to add those in. Now, there’s a lot of information in the high frequencies that we don’t need, as our other layers are taking care of that space.

I’m not going to be too precise on this sound design as I just want you to understand how Reformer Pro works and how it can make things very fast and efficient.

From Robotic Lifeforms to Rhythm Impact Machines – the size of the Krotos libraries is just crazy. You can find pretty much anything you’re looking for. Whats amazing is that you can start with presets and then you can create with your own from them sound as well. It’s a really nice workflow.

In Part 2, Ben Builds upon this design, using weaponiser and MIDI to trigger further sounds to bring his sound design to life!

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Products Used in this Video

Buy Now

Reformer Pro

Reformer Pro is a unique ‘sound design instrument’, that transforms pre-recorded audio files into performable sound... €404.67 Buy Now

SoundMorph Robotic Lifeforms 2 Sound Effects Library

Robotic, Sci-Fi, Mechanical, Servo, Transformer, UI, AI, Pneumatic, Devices, Movement Robotic Lifeforms 2 by SoundMorph is one... €313.65 Buy Now

SoundBits Drag & Slide Sound Effects Library

Provided by SoundBits. This sound effects compilation is a composite and versatile collection of sounds that feature various objects that... €141.45 Buy Now

SoundBits Foley Sound Effects Bundle

Meet your Foley sound design toolkit. The SoundBits Foley Sound Effects Library Bundle combines 6 SoundBits Libraries: Antiques,... €301.35

The post How to Create Robot Movement Sound Effects with Ben Jacquier appeared first on Krotos.

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How To Create Chain Sound Effects
Thursday April 28, 2022



Chain Sound Effects with Reformer Pro

In this how-to tutorial, Alessandro Mastroianni shows how you can use the Soundbits Just Chains library alongside Reformer Pro to create natural sounding, high-quality chain foley as if you were in your own foley studio. let’s check it out!

Watch the chain sound effects design video below



Chain Dragging Sound Effects Video Breakdown

The first scene is in a gym. Someone is training with a chain tied to a kettlebell. In the second scene, we have some shackled wrists trying to free themselves from the constraint of the chain. This gives us a range of lengths and dynamics to work with.

We have used four instances of Reformer Pro here. The first one deals with the rattling short bursts of chain movement and the second instance is a long, continuous rattling of the chain because of the hands moving together.

Chain Rattling Sound Effects

For the second scene, I’ve picked a few samples and adjusted some of the parameters to my liking by setting a position on the XY Pad.

Reformer Pro is the software equivalent of a foley studio – instead of recording materials as audio, we are recording any audio to trigger reformer to generate the materials from the library.

My workflow for this was to use the audio input and, as my own Foley artist, make some vocalisations into a microphone to copy the actions what was happening on screen.

Finishing touches for our Chain SFX

I added a touch of reverb and did some minor moving and stretching to get the sounds in sync perfectly to the video. The second track is a duplicate of the first with adjusted parameters on the Xypad to get a slower-moving sound.

As well as vocalisations, I’ve used the sound of wrapping paper and rubbed it together against the microphone to get a continued sound to reform. You can use contact microphones for this purpose or any other object that you feel could mimic the movement you see, so have some fun and experiment!

Wondering what we used in our Chain Sound Effects video? Take a look below!

If you need chain sound effects, you need Just Chains by Soundbits – perfect for automating, or performing in real-time using Reformer Pro. This sound effects library offers a vast collection of metal chain sound effects that are designed to work either out-of-the-box in Reformer Pro, or as traditional sample WAV files.

From shackle sounds, chain dragging and pulling sound effect, heavy chain sounds, chain rattling, through to drops, shakes, whips and jingles, this chain sound effect library covers all bases.

Buy Now

SoundBits Just Chains Sound Effects Library

The Just Chains Bundle by SoundBits offers a vast collection of metal chain sound effects, fully... €60.27 Buy Now

Reformer Pro

Reformer Pro is a unique ‘sound design instrument’, that transforms pre-recorded audio files into performable sound... €404.67

Free Chains Sound Effects Download

We have included a taster pack of sounds made using this process for you to try out yourself through traditional drag & drop sound design.

Download Free Chain Sound Effects



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The post How to Create Chain Sound Effects appeared first on Krotos.

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Free Sound Effects, Dark Drones 2022 – Volume IV
Wednesday April 27, 2022


https://youtu.be/QuWNEeSwzlY



To Download This Library and be Notified Each Month, Fill in the Form Below: Free Drone Sound Effects 2022 – Volume IV

Krotos Free SFX: Dark Drones.

Designed in-house by Krotos sound designers, these powerful and eerie dark drone sound effects will add tonnes of mood and gloom to your sound design projects, games, installations and compositions.

Featuring both tonal and atonal sounds, use them as they are, or manipulate and granulate them for some otherworldly spooky effects. The sounds work excellently when layered together on top of each other or weaving in and out of eachother.

These free drone sound effects are great for horror, thriller, sci-fi, gritty drama’s or drone/ambient projects, plug countess others. the library is complete with metadata and ready to be added to your sound designs.

There are both synthesised drone sound effects and ones sculpted from field recordings and found sounds for a versatile selection of textures and tones.

To start your collection of free sound effects, sign up for our newsletter and receive new interviews and educational tutorial content as well as your monthly sound collection.

Already a member? Your work is done – you have already been receiving our sounds each month automatically!

Drone Sound Effects Categories:

Bass Rumbles, Tonal Resonances, Interplanetary Wind, Spaceship Room Tones, Space Ambience and more.



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How To Sound Design Hospital Room Tones
Friday April 22, 2022



Want to know how to create your own indoor ambiences and room tones? Check out the tutorial below! We combine synthesis, samples and granulation to create the ambience for an operating theatre scene.

Room tone sound design is one of the least exciting things we have to create as sound designers, but it is certainly necessary for adding realism and depth to our scenes. In this tutorial, Alessandro Mastroianni explains how you can sound design rich and detailed indoor ambience and room tones using Concept 2, using a surgical operating theatre as a setting.

Create Fantastic Room Tones Using Concept 2.

Today, I want to show you how you can very easily create room tones using Concept 2. To demonstrate this, we are going to design the room tone for a simple hospital scene. I’m imagining fan noise, air conditioning unit and beeping machinery of heart monitoring systems. I’ve used three instances of concept in this design and I’m going to walk you through each one of them.

The first sound that I designed for the scene was a heart monitoring machine which is a soft, quiet beeping sound. To do this in Concept, simply set Concept to oscillator mode (OSC) rather than granular (GRN), then set the blend to use only one waveform by setting it to 0.0, and choose the sine wave (~).

Pro Tip: The envelope shape will make the most difference to the sound from this point – a slightly softened attack parameter around 0.3ms will remove any clickiness from the sine tone without it fading in. Adjust the decay and release to suit longer or shorter beeps.

You can tweak the filter cut-off to remove any additional high frequencies, and I have added a subtle amount of Reverb to add space and realism. Concept 2’s built-in convolution reverb covers all bases from big cathedral spaces to the smallest room ambience.

Concept 2

€141.45

Once I designed the beep sound for the heart monitoring device, I wanted a basic ambience, so I used one of the presets that Concept 2 ships with. There is some more experimental ones but the mid-room background seemed to do the trick for me.

And then I used the granular engine with a sound I had recorded. I recorded a dehumidifier which makes a beep when you turn it on and switch it off. I imported it and tweaked the spray, density, flux and drift knobs so that it randomly triggers the sample at different points and sometimes hits the beep, to add more depth and suggest other machines within the theatre. Try importing your sounds into the granular engine and see what you come up with!



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The post How to Sound Design Hospital Room Tones appeared first on Krotos.

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Horizon: Forbidden West Sound Design – Redesigning Tremortusk Roars With Dehumaniser 2
Thursday April 21, 2022



Part 3 of Joshua Gouzy‘s video game sound effects redesign is here! this time he is redesigning the Tremortusk roar sound design from Horizon: Forbidden West using Dehumaniser 2!

Joshua is a Sound Designer, Composer & New Orleans Jazz Bassist with a passion for games. In this three-part feature, Joshua shares how he redesigned this scene from Horizon: Forbidden West using Reformer Pro, Weaponiser & Dehumaniser 2.

Did you miss the other tutorials in this Horizon: Forbidden West sound design series? Here is part 1 and part 2. Don’t worry, each tutorial is for a different sound, so you can check them out in any order you like!

Joshua Gouzy:

A crucial skill for any sound designer is to be capable of delivering top-quality assets quickly and efficiently. While I am confident in my abilities as a designer to bring me to the necessary end result, the Krotos plugins have essentially turbocharged my workflow. Now I can get to the end result much faster.

As exciting and rewarding as it is to discover and create synthesis and/or samples and shape them to the needs of a project, there are certain aspects of sound designing that can get repetitive and tedious. The Krotos plugins I use cut down on those times tremendously, leaving me with more room for sonic exploration and creativity, which naturally results in better quality assets, and an overall happier client.

When starting a new project, it’s never a question of whether or not I would use a Krotos plugin, but rather how many I’ll use. When planning my approach for rescoring the sound design for a battle sequence in the new video game Horizon: Forbidden West, I knew from the very start that I would be using the Krotos plugins Reformer Pro, Weaponiser and Dehumaniser 2

For the Tremortusk’s roar, my goal was to craft a sound effect that reflected the idea of the machine itself, in a sense that it was very much a robot, but it also felt like a living, autonomous creature capable of experiencing pain and emotion.

After designing a very angry-robot-sounding patch in Kiloheart’s Phase Plant, I manipulated and layered in 50 samples throughout the sequence that included a wide variety of heavily processed sounds such as pitched-down alligator growls, auto-tuned sea lions, steam whistles, whooshes, a sub drop, and of course, reversed trumpeting elephants.

After combining all of these elements together, I still felt it needed some life. It was lacking a defining character that bridged the gap between the organic and the mechanical; something that would truly make it come alive. So I called in my 6-year-old son and set up the microphone with Dehumaniser 2.

I first showed him the video without audio, and asked him “What do you think this bad guy would sound like in real life?” He thought about it, and we made several record passes. Afterward, we sat down together and ran his clips through Dehumaniser 2, and had an absolute blast.

I’ll never forget his shouts of pure joy and excitement as we morphed his voice into all sorts of creatures, robots, aliens, and more. After a lot of laughing and goofing around, we decided to keep all of his recordings (did I mention I love layering?) and used our own modified versions of the Dehumaniser 2’s presets Basic Vocoder, Dubby and Drugged, Old Robot, and Mammoth on them.

Once it was done, I felt the Tremortusk now had a defining voice that carried an essence of life, emotion, and weight, while still staying true to its robotic roots.

Additional spots where Dehumaniser 2 was used:
● Raptor voice

See the Final Result:

This post wraps up Joshua Gouzy’s three-part design process for his Horizon: Forbidden West redesign. catch part 1 and part 2 here and for more on Joshua and his work, Visit his website: https://www.joshuagouzy.com/


Horizon: Forbidden West Sound Design – Redesigning Cloth Foley With Reformer Pro

Join us for part 1 of a three-part feature, where Composer & Sound Designer Joshua Gouzy re-designs a scene from Horizon: Forbidden West!...

Horizon: Forbidden West Video Game Sound Design. Redesigning Tremortusk Cannons with Weaponiser

Part 2 of a three-part feature, with Joshua Gouzy, who has re-designed a scene from Horizon: Forbidden West!...



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The post Horizon: Forbidden West Sound Design – Redesigning Tremortusk Roars With Dehumaniser 2 appeared first on Krotos.

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How To Create Huge Dinosaur Roar Sound Effects. One Quick Guide, Two Methods.
Thursday April 14, 2022



Dinosaur Roars, Screams, and Growling Sounds



Recently, Avid shared a fantastic video by Sound Designer, Joy Banerjee, in which he created dinosaur roar sound effects from scratch using his voice and a chain of plugins.

The minute-long video was a time-lapse demonstrating the recording of his voice as source material, and various stages of the process.

We spoke to Joy who broke the video down for us.

But this got us thinking. How would we make these sounds? And can we do it faster? Learn both methods in this blog.

First, discover how Joy made his awesome roars in a step by step guide below.

Then we’ll show you how we’d create dinosaur roar sound effects.



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A post shared by Avid (@avidtechnology)



Sound Designer Joy Banerjee in the Recording Studio

Dinosaur Roar Sound Effects – The Joy Banerjee Method

“I recorded a few vocal layers whilst watching the video, and tried to match the intensity and energy.”

Layer 1

“I first pitch-shifted my voice down by 7 semitones to place it within the low frequency range, and then and added an EQ to boost the bass for the body. I also boosted the high-mids and high frequencies to bring out the grainy textures within my voice.

Next, I processed the vocal takes with Waves OVox changing the formant, tone, compression, and distortion parameters.”

Layer 2

“I again pitch-shifted the voice down, this time by 12 semitones and added some multiband distortion and saturation. I then added the Pro Tools Lo-fi plugin for additional saturation.”

Layer 3

“For my growling layer, I used a doubler to create some width. I then balanced the volume of the layers and added some reverb for depth and space.”

Follow @joy.in.music



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Dinosaur Roar Sound Effects with Dehumaniser 2 – The Krotos Method. A Simpler Workflow.

Watch this 60 second video to learn how Dehumaniser 2 can fast-track your workflow. Simplifying the process of creating dinosaur roar sound effects.





Video Transcription

We have this dinosaur roar scene that we want to design.

I want to show you how it easy it is to do it with Dehumaniser 2.

So here, if I bypass Dehumaniser. I just recorded myself screaming at the microphone… which is always fun to do!

And then I’ve actually got started with the Growly Beast preset. Which sounded pretty good, but I thought I could do better.

So I created this different preset. I just added the noise generator and tweaked the delay pitching a little bit from the Growly Beast preset. You get a bit more growl and a bit more size.

It was incredibly easy. Literally took 10 seconds.



You can create awesome dinosaur roars and growls using your voice and Dehumaniser 2, our creature vocal suite.

The drag and drop interface lets you have multiple pitch shifting instances instantly in the same window. This saves time and effort compared to duplicating and pitching audio files!

Combine this with a noise generator and a granular engine to craft new high end frequencies that are lost as a result of pitching down – no need to boost the high end frequencies that aren’t there, you can introduce new textures that follow the envelope of your voice.

With a built-in EQ and other fantastic FX, your voice literally becomes a pig squeal or a lion roar or other animal, using our scrubbing convolution.

With some practice and some creative ideas, you can be on your way to creating awesome dinosaur roar SFX in minutes!

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The post How To Create Huge Dinosaur Roar Sound Effects. One Quick Guide, Two Methods. appeared first on Krotos.

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Learn to create tension and movement with music for a sci-fi scene using Concept 2. ______________________________________________________ DEMO: Buy / Demo: https://www.krotosaudio.com/concept/ FOLLOW US: Subscribe to our Youtube channel to stay tuned for more episodes and tutorials. Facebook:...
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Made with Concept 2 | Earth from Space Station | The Music Jul 12, 2021
This is the first instalment of our brand new 'Made with Concept 2' series. Take a listen to this gorgeous, atmospheric piece of music created by Krotos' Matthew Collings. We'll then demonstrate how easily this can be created using Concept 2. Follow the the link below to find out how we made...
Made with Concept 2 | Earth from Space Station | How to Video
Made with Concept 2 | Earth from Space Station | How to Jul 12, 2021
Here we'll demonstrate how to create the atmospheric music we showed you in part 1. The process is quick and easily. If you haven't watched part 1 yet - what are you doing here! Go watch part 1 ;-) Part 1: https://youtu.be/Ogovba2juF8 ______________________________________________________ DEMO:...
Concept 2 | Personalising your synth sound with our Granular Oscillator Video
Concept 2 | Personalising your synth sound with our Granular Oscillator Jul 1, 2021
Create Unique Sounds Fast in Concept 2 with Alessandro Mastroianni Here I'll take you through the brand new granular engine. I’ll show you how to take a pretty simple, one note, kalimba recording, and transform it to get a beautiful, organic, but somehow glitchy pad. It sounds great! We ‘ll make...
Concept 2 | Getting inspiration and variation quickly with Tweak It Video
Concept 2 | Getting inspiration and variation quickly with Tweak It Jul 1, 2021
Create Unique Sounds Fast in Concept 2 with Alessandro Mastroianni Next thing that I want to talk to you about is the Tweak It module, the Tweak It module is a module that lets you randomise a bunch of parameters all at the same time. You can get infinite variations out of the same sound. You...

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WaveformNik
Nikola Nikita Jeremic @WaveformNik (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Friday May 20, 2022
It's always nice to chat with friends from @KrotosAudio . :) We talked a little bit about sound design and music fo… https://t.co/SbT6N68Jqy
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Friday May 13, 2022
We've given a Reformer Pro a revamp making it bigger and better than ever before. You can now tackle more everyday… https://t.co/Eyw5i7mWAD
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Friday May 6, 2022
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Vale Viola @ValeViolaMusic (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Thursday May 5, 2022
I wrote an article for @KrotosAudio this week with some tips to get started in game audio! 👾 🎶 You can heck it out… https://t.co/D51wp5NYCt
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday May 5, 2022
This week on our weekly Sound Sunday Newsletter, we had tutorials and how-to's a-plenty. We send one out each Sund… https://t.co/kiaJ2WExRe
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday May 3, 2022
@JuusoTolonen This sounds fantastic Juuso! ...did someone say breakdown thread? 🤔😄
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Monday May 2, 2022
The awesome @ben_jacquier creating some epic robot movement sound effects in this killer re-design using Krotos Ult… https://t.co/gYvIos9vfY
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday April 28, 2022
This Months Free SFX are ready, this time it is a collection of awesome dark drones to add to your collection. LIN… https://t.co/fQfD2osp3r
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday April 28, 2022
Have you ever heard about Alexa Skills? 🤔 Vale Viola from Firelight Audio explains how she designed sound effects… https://t.co/3thTkm4Blc
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday April 28, 2022
@ValeViolaMusic It was a pleasure speaking with you Vale Viola 😊
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Andrew Auten @AndrewASound (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Sunday April 24, 2022
Match made in heaven here. @krotosaudio and @blackboxanalog Epic sniper rifle sounds. #soundeffects… https://t.co/hu96toJsg5
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday April 20, 2022
An awesome and important thread to read for all sound designers - thanks for sharing @juanpaudio https://t.co/IBYDQY1J19
Juan Pablo Uribe @juanpaudio
#gameaudio sound designers I'm going to tell you an obvious secret for how to become a better sound designer. It's… https://t.co/XUzXiNoznw
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday April 20, 2022
Matteo @MatteoTummino
made some weird sounds on the modular and decided to redesign some lightsabers 🌝 https://t.co/NcmNGMFGbH
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Tune in to @BBCRadio4 later today, between 5-6pm, for a special feature on the Sound of the Year Awards! Our chair… https://t.co/lSo5nzI3KS
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Friday April 15, 2022
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday April 13, 2022
Mark Lanza is a Supervising Sound Editor & Sound Designer with 30+ years of experience in the industry and over 267… https://t.co/ss4TKD3Rmt
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday April 5, 2022
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday March 30, 2022
@ValeViolaMusic Refarter Pro should be the title of our next plugin 😂
javibelze
Javi Belze @javibelze (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Monday March 28, 2022
Testing Sound Design for Angry Radish Pets! #minabo (@devilishgames ) @KrotosAudio #soundesign #gameaudio… https://t.co/lmC86vm3Fl
Slaleky
Alec Shea @Slaleky (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Friday March 25, 2022
Had a chat with @KrotosAudio about how I got into #gameaudio! If you're a bit curious about some of my design proce… https://t.co/mbuWlcBq07
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday March 24, 2022
@Naii Hi Naii! I'm sorry to hear that you are experiencing some crashes with our software, I'll get some more info… https://t.co/8d7ahsJdTr
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 22, 2022
So cool to see a #videogame in the making! Hidden Level Audio are currently working on the car engine sound effects… https://t.co/2fKYvS6p3w
joshua_gouzy
Joshua Gouzy @joshua_gouzy (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Monday March 21, 2022
Here is my sound design rescore of Aloy's intense battle with a very irritated Tremortusk. It was all completed usi… https://t.co/Bu4pqB6Zue
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Friday March 18, 2022
A Great read from a @asoundeffect! great to hear #ReformerPro being used in 'Reacher' in the hands of Mr @Markl006… https://t.co/9Y6vq3WLng
A Sound Effect @asoundeffect
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday March 16, 2022
New Interview Alert! Awesome Composer/Sound Designer Chris Howard told us all about how he uses Krotos in his comp… https://t.co/jQEc6LZbOm
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 15, 2022
Concept 2 - powerful modulation in a sleek and simple interface. Giving you all the flexibility you could need with… https://t.co/pSSfCiG2c3
sound_awards
Sound of the Year Awards @sound_awards (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Tuesday March 15, 2022
Also, a big thank you to all of our partners who joined us this year: LOM, @ForestryEngland, @ACSCustomUK,… https://t.co/divOWoRIKZ
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 15, 2022
@EssaHansen Congratulations Essa! 👏
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 15, 2022
@NickInterlandi 👏👏!!
QGRecs
Quality Goods Records @QGRecs (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Monday March 14, 2022
🚨 Remix Contest 🚨 Calling all producers! In honor of @SebjinMG newest release “Ring feat MARS 88”, we’re putting t… https://t.co/Xdw7dziGXo
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 15, 2022
@_BenCaesar @izzy_marizee @vannyaudio Hey Ben! 😁
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Friday March 11, 2022
Load sounds to Reformer & Use a Microphone like a prop in a Foley studio - Reformer will follow your input in real… https://t.co/NeoeBfCcre
izzy_marizee
Christa Giammattei Sound @izzy_marizee (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Friday March 11, 2022
Me and @vannyaudio are hopping on another live today over on Instagram chatting about our workflow, templates, plug… https://t.co/3yyYihPAIk
GezSounds
Gez Lloyd @GezSounds (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Wednesday March 9, 2022
My plugin purchase of the year so far has to be @KrotosAudio Reformer. So easy to throw together quick libraries o… https://t.co/mgyA2STlxd
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday March 9, 2022
Jason is a Sound Designer at Dick & Rogers Sound Studios who has working on huge animations including Transformers… https://t.co/LaKDVf2B1d
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 8, 2022
We had the pleasure of chatting w/ the awesome @izzy_marizee about her post-production audio work, her highly enter… https://t.co/Ry7ORDbtDK
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Tuesday March 8, 2022
Happy #InternationalWomensDay to all the amazing women in sound! How better to celebrate than with an interview wi… https://t.co/PJMSI9DV3T
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Monday March 7, 2022
@EmmaButtSound @DianeKemp1 @izzy_marizee @vannyaudio @lennyabrahamson it absolutely includes you too Emma! 🙏
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Krotos @KrotosAudio Monday March 7, 2022
@Sinevibes Glad you are okay Artemiy, Stay safe!
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Monday March 7, 2022
We spoke to Composer Joshua Fielstra recently on the composition/sound design process for film trailers, where he s… https://t.co/5DDcESNON6
EmmaButtSound
Emma Butt Sound @EmmaButtSound (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Monday March 7, 2022
Thanks so much @KrotosAudio for featuring me in great company with @izzy_marizee and @vannyaudio in their latest in… https://t.co/kMdMhFNuqW
JonPascone
Jon Pascone (accomplished) GDC @JonPascone (retweeted by @KrotosAudio) Monday March 7, 2022
I feel so blessed to have @KrotosAudio igniter to depend on for my first vehicle based game 😭 #gameaudio
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Monday March 7, 2022
@JonPascone Awesome Jon! it'd be great to see how you put it to use too! 🏁
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Friday March 4, 2022
Did you catch this awesome video by #DavidDumais earlier in the week? It's 🔥 create #scifi gun #sfx using your own… https://t.co/s4adr5JL27
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday March 3, 2022
@dabravanel Thanks David! Gabor Lazar's work is amazing, and Max is a powerful tool - we use it here for prototypin… https://t.co/KiqzWgNqdb
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday March 3, 2022
David Abravanel @dabravanel
1/ I very much enjoy Lazar's new album, but there are *so* many devs out there who are all over these new digital f… https://t.co/lQ43uqZN8C
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday February 24, 2022
Free Sounds 2022 Volume II is out now! 🔥 These pristine quality free sound effects are the perfect assets for hard… https://t.co/LWKG8EYkpK
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Thursday February 24, 2022
Check out this #ReformerPro video from @jamesdave3 https://t.co/mnlX0lamqS ! #sounddesign #soundfx #sounddesigner… https://t.co/RTDkiaGMcu
💀🔇jdr3 📽️🔈🔉🔊 @jamesdave3
@krotosaudio FTW on a scene for a series I'm currently working on. IYKYK, or check out my YT channel to see how I… https://t.co/fBo5H1dv7K
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday February 23, 2022
Only a few days left to submit to the Sound of the Year Awards! We put a blog together for everything you need to k… https://t.co/7P9m5U2JYw
Sound of the Year Awards @sound_awards
Final call for submissions for the Sound of the Year Awards 2021! Discover our award categories and submit your e… https://t.co/UFu2gLf0iI
KrotosAudio
Krotos @KrotosAudio Wednesday February 23, 2022
@AvidProTools 😂😂😂

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